Higher fruits and vegetables intake fuels better mental well-being among children

Higher fruits and vegetables intake fuels better mental well-being among children

Higher fruits and vegetables intake fuels better mental well-being among children. A new study discovered that children who eat fruits and vegetables have better mental health. However, children who refused to eat their meals were more likely to have lower well-being scores.

A new study now appears in the journal BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health.

The study shows an association between eating more fruits and vegetables with a better sense of mental well-being among children.

This is ongoing research that analyzes the factors that influence mental health and well-being. It investigates the relationship between nutrition and mental health and how nutrition is linked to the mental well-being of children.

For the study, the researchers collected data from more than 50 schools, including primary schools, secondary schools, and further education colleges. The investigators used a mental health assessment called the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale. Students in primary school used an assessment called the Stirling Children’s Well-Being Scale.

The research found that for both primary and secondary school children, mental well-being scores were higher for those who ate breakfast or lunch compared to for children who did not eat these meals.

“In a class of 30 secondary school children, we found that [four] had nothing to eat or drink before starting classes in the morning, and three had nothing to eat or drink before the afternoon. Only 25% of children ate five or more fruits and vegetables a day, and 1 in 10 ate none,” Study co-author Prof. Ailsa Welch said.