Research outlines preventive measures to stop Delta variant spread

Research outlines preventive measures to stop Delta variant spread

Research outlines preventive measures to stop Delta variant spread. Recent research looks at possible solutions to reduce the spread of the Delta variant and its impact.

The study authors state that although vaccines may not stop cases from emerging, they can curb possible outcomes from the disease.

According to the research, policymakers must develop “middle-of-the-road” vaccine mandates to encourage more people to get vaccinated.

Unvaccinated populations are getting affected by the record surge in COVID-19 Delta variant cases in the United States. One study notes that recent exposure to misinformation can create vaccine hesitancy among unvaccinated people.

According to recent research, the Delta variant was detected first in India in December 2020. Experts then identify it in the U.S. in March 2021. They studied the classification of

In recent research, health officials first identified the Delta variant in India in December 2020. Experts then detected it in the U.S. in March 2021. It gained the classification of “variant of concern” in collaboration with the SARS-CoV-2 Interagency Group, set up by the Department of Health and Human Services.

The author also suggests that delta is 40-60% more transmissible than Alpha variant and less responsive to treatments and vaccines.

The authors conclude, “Vaccines are the only way forward to preserve healthcare infrastructure and the economy and contain the pandemic.”

The article appears in JAMA.

“With so many Americans refusing to be vaccinated, I don’t see how higher rates of vaccination are possible without mandates,” Johnson who was not involved in the paper said. “There are some who think mandates involve coercing individuals to be vaccinated against their will. That’s false.”