Height Loss Linked To Increased Mortality Risk From Stroke In Women

Height Loss Linked To Increased Mortality Risk From Stroke In Women

Height loss linked to increased mortality risk from stroke in women. The latest study suggests that height loss in middle age has associations with a heightened risk of dying from a stroke.

The study authors show that doctors could consider the height loss in early and middle adulthood to identify high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), including stroke in women.

Some causes of height loss include shrinkage of the discs between the vertebrae of the spinal column, and changes in a posture with aging.

The new research suggests that people who lose their height at their middle age are more at risk of developing low bone mineral density, vertebral fractures, and vitamin D deficiency.

Previous studies have shown an association between rapid height loss in mixed cohorts of men and women and a greater overall mortality rate and increased risk of (CVD).

For the new research, the scientists at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden analyzed the correlation of height loss in middle age with a greater risk of overall mortality and cardiovascular mortality in women.

Their findings appear in the journal BMJ Open.

The researchers included 1,147 women in Sweden and 1,259 women in Denmark. During the examination, the researchers found a link between height loss and stroke mortality.

They suggest that healthcare professionals should consider height loss, particularly in women, to identify individuals at increased CVD risk.

The authors conclude, “These findings suggest the need for increased attention to height loss to identify individuals at increased CVD risk. Moreover, regular physical activity may be beneficial not only in the prevention of CVD but also in the prevention of height loss and thereby further contributing to CVD prevention.”