Fasting May Help Prevent Some Infections, New Mouse Study Finds

Fasting May Help Prevent Some Infections, New Mouse Study Finds

Fasting may help prevent some infections, new mouse study finds. Fasting and fasting-based therapies are becoming popular as health-promoting tools.

Now, new research in mice suggests that fasting can neutralize Salmonella infections. This study was conducted at the University of British Columbia (UBC), Canada. The study found that fasting prevents Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, triggering the gastrointestinal disease, from causing inflammation or tissue damage.

The study’s senior author Dr. Bruce Vallance, Ph.D., B.Sc., of the UBC, says that therapeutic fasting is gaining recognition and acceptance as a popular tool for patients with chronic autoimmune or autoinflammatory diseases.

The scientists also found similar results with another bacterium called Campylobacter jejuniTrusted Source. According to them, the study findings may also apply to other enteric infections.

The new study featured in PLOS Pathogens.

For the study, the scientists fed Salmonella Typhimurium to a group of mice-fasted for 24 hours. After an additional 24 hours, the researchers tested the mice to examine the state of their Salmonella Typhimurium infections. They found mice that ate Salmonella Typhimurium, developed infection through the intestine and invaded the intestinal wall, causing tissue damage.

The scientists predict that fasting had altered the pH balance in mice's stomachs, preventing Salmonella Typhimurium. The researchers concluded that the fasted mice’ gut bacteria restrained Salmonella Typhimurium.

He continued, “Many of the beneficial effects of fasting will not carry over to intermittent fasting or time-restricted eating in humans. A multiple-day fast in humans is very different from an intermittent fast and will trigger different pathways and mechanisms.”

Dr. Vallance says, “Many of the beneficial effects of fasting will not carry over to intermittent fasting or time-restricted eating in humans. A multiple-day fast in humans is very different from an intermittent fast and will trigger different pathways and mechanisms.”